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DevOps Patterns & Antipatterns for Continuous Software Updates

Webinar

Think About Your Audience Before Choosing a Webinar Title


Sponsored by jfrog


Tuesday, April 21, 2020
11am ET

So, you want to update the software for your user, be it the nodes in your K8s cluster, a browser on user’s desktop, an app in user’s smartphone or even a user’s car. What can possibly go wrong?

In this talk, we’ll analyze real-world software update fails and how multiple DevOps patterns, that fit a variety of scenarios, could have saved the developers. Manually making sure that everything works before sending an update and expecting the user to do acceptance tests before they update is most definitely not on the list of such patterns.

Join us for some awesome and scary continuous update horror stories and some obvious (and some not so obvious) proven ideas for improvement and best practices you can start following tomorrow.

Baruch Sadogursky
Head of Developer Relations - JFrog
Baruch Sadogursky (a.k.a JBaruch) is the Chief Sticker Officer (also, Head of Developer Relations) at JFrog. His passion is speaking about technology. Well, speaking in general, but doing it about technology makes him look smart, and 17 years of hi-tech experience sure helps. When he’s not on stage (or on a plane to get there), he learns about technology, people and how they work, or more precisely, don’t work together. He is a CNCF ambassador, Developer Champion, and a professional conference speaker on DevOps, Java and Groovy topics, and is a regular at the industry’s most prestigious events including JavaOne (where he was awarded a Rock Star award), DockerCon, Devoxx, DevOps Days, OSCON, Qcon and many others. You can follow him @jbaruch on Twitter.

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What You’ll Learn in This Webinar

You’ve probably written a hundred abstracts in your day, but have you come up with a template that really seems to resonate? Go back through your past webinar inventory and see what events produced the most registrants. Sure – this will vary by topic but what got their attention initially was the description you wrote.

Paint a mental image of the benefits of attending your webinar. Often times this can be summarized in the title of your event. Your prospects may not even make it to the body of the message, so get your point across immediately.  Capture their attention, pique their interest, and push them towards the desired action (i.e. signing up for your event). You have to make them focus and you have to do it fast. Using an active voice and bullet points is great way to do this.

Always add key takeaways. Something like this....In this session, you’ll learn about:

  • You know you’ve cringed at misspellings and improper grammar before, so don’t get caught making the same mistake.
  • Get a second or even third set of eyes to review your work.
  • It reflects on your professionalism even if it has nothing to do with your event.